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Clone Our safety and sustainability

Clone - Our Safety & Sustainability Standard is the strictest in Australia and New Zealand.

CLONE WHY DO WE NEED A STANDARD?

Clone - Quite simply: there isn’t one The shops (online and on the streets) are packed with products that claim to be natural, organic, and ecofriendly. But the issue is that no one’s governing what goes into these products or how they’re labelled, which means they’re often not as good for us as we think.

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CLONE Our commitment

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LIST OF INGREDIENTS

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Synthetic surfactants, APEs are most often found in detergents, cleaning products, pesticides, lubricants, hair dyes, and hair care products. What’s most alarming about these toxins is that once they enter a living organism, they accumulate in tissues over time. APEs are suspected endocrine disruptors that also mimic estrogen, and have been linked to the development of breast cancer cells. The easiest way to identify them on ingredient labels is to look for the suffix “—phenol ethoxylate.”

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Synthetic surfactants, APEs are most often found in detergents, cleaning products, pesticides, lubricants, hair dyes, and hair care products. What’s most alarming about these toxins is that once they enter a living organism, they accumulate in tissues over time. APEs are suspected endocrine disruptors that also mimic estrogen, and have been linked to the development of breast cancer cells. The easiest way to identify them on ingredient labels is to look for the suffix “—phenol ethoxylate.”

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Synthetic surfactants, APEs are most often found in detergents, cleaning products, pesticides, lubricants, hair dyes, and hair care products. What’s most alarming about these toxins is that once they enter a living organism, they accumulate in tissues over time. APEs are suspected endocrine disruptors that also mimic estrogen, and have been linked to the development of breast cancer cells. The easiest way to identify them on ingredient labels is to look for the suffix “—phenol ethoxylate.”

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To deem whether a product is a more sustainable option, we consider its:

CARBON IMPACT

A products carbon footprint can be quite extensive when you consider where the ingredients/materials came from, how the product was produced, and how it was transported. We take this into consideration and support local Australian and New Zealand brands where possible.

CARBON IMPACT

A products carbon footprint can be quite extensive when you consider where the ingredients/materials came from,

CARBON IMPACT

A products carbon footprint can be quite extensive when you consider where the ingredients/materials came from, how the product was produced, and how it was transported. We take this into consideration and support local Australian and New Zealand brands where possible.

EVER EVOLVING

Our standard is ever evolving with the advances in scientific research. To stay across any changes to our standard, keep watch of our blog, newsletters and social media feeds.

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